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Toyota’s New Fuel Cell Module Could Be A Gamechanger For Hydrogen


Toyota Motor Corporation has developed a fuel cell system module and looks to start selling it after the spring this year in a bid to promote hydrogen use and help the world achieve carbon neutrality goals, the world’s largest car manufacturer said on Friday.

According to Toyota, the new module can be used by companies developing fuel cell (FC) applications for trucks, buses, trains, and ships, as well as stationary generators.

The fuel cell system module can be directly connected to an existing electrical instrument provided with a motor, inverter, and battery, Toyota said today, noting that the modularization significantly improves convenience.

The “module has achieved a world-class, top level output density per unit volume,” said Toyota, adding that the maintenance requirements are simple and infrequent.

Toyota is selling the Mirai fuel cell vehicle running on hydrogen, and plans to boost tenfold the global sales of the Mirai with the second-generation Mirai. The new Toyota Mirai will have a 30-percent increase in driving range to around 650 kilometers (404 miles), the carmaker said at the end of November.

“In addition to its effort to popularize FCEVs, Toyota will continue to strengthen its initiatives as an FC system supplier to promote hydrogen utilization through the popularization of FC products together with various FC product companies with the aim of reducing CO2 emissions to curtail global warming and to contribute to the achievement of carbon neutrality,” Toyota said in its statement today.

Apart from Toyota, South Korea’s Hyundai Motor Corp is also working on hydrogen fuel cell technology, while several major automakers have announced in recent weeks increased focus on electric vehicles (EVs).

The biggest commitment came from GM, which said in January that it was going all-in toward an all-electric future, aiming to eliminate all tailpipe emissions from new light-duty vehicles by 2035 as part of a wider strategy to become a carbon-neutral business by 2040.

Last week, Ford Motor Company became the latest automaker to target an all-electric lineup, saying it would move to all-electric passenger vehicles in Europe by 2030.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

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